Latest news, New Mum, Newborn Care

The Ultimate Checklist – Bathtime

Welcome to the next instalment of my ultimate equipment checklist. This post covers all that you might need for bathing baby. You can find the full checklist here and follow the links on that page to the other posts covering other equipment categories.

Baby Bath

There are several options for baby baths. Most people start with a basic baby bath tub, which enables you to do the bathing in any room in the house. You simply move the tub to the room you choose. You can get small simple tubs or ones with integrated seats or supports to help keep baby in position.

I can not emphasise enough that you should never rely on a bath seat to support baby in a bath. They can slip or fail and baby could end up under the water. Never ever leave a baby unattended in the bath even for a second. Ignore the phone and door or remove the baby from the water and wrap them in a towel. After that, you can put them in a safe place like a Moses basket before you leave the room.

As baby grows and is more able to sit up in the bath, you might like to try a bath seat to support them. You should still not leave them unattended in the seat.

There are also bath dividers available which can be useful if you don’t want to buy a smaller baby bath tub. These fit into your existing bath so that you can just fill a portion of it. As a result, you save water and filling time. It also means that toys can’t float so far away from little one during play!

Hooded towels

These are brilliant for drying baby after the bath. The hood keeps precious warmth from escaping from little one’s head. Their shape also makes swaddling much easier.

I would always recommend using two towels to dry the baby to start with. That’s because you might be a little slower at putting on the nappy and dressing them when they are new and small. In order to keep baby as warm as possible, dry them off with one towel first, then throw that in the hamper and use a fresh dry towel to wrap around baby while you dress them.

Washcloth

Small washcloths or flannels can be helpful for washing baby in much the same way that you would use it on yourself. It holds water, so you can wet all the areas of their skin and their hair. It also offer a little more friction than just using your hands, which can be helpful in the early days. That’s because in the first six weeks after birth we recommend that you don’t use any skincare products on baby, no matter how many midwives might use them, according to their adverts!

Baby’s skin is very sensitive and adjusting to being in the outside world. It has to develop a set of normal healthy bacteria and acids. If you use anything other than plain water you risk disrupting this developing balance and this may be linked to increases in eczema and other skin problems. Once the baby is 6 weeks old, you can begin using skincare products. I will be writing another post on newborn skincare shortly, so look out for that for more information.

Baby shampoo or bubble bath

As I’ve mentioned above, for first six weeks after the birth, the recommendation is to avoid products for skin care. Instead, use plain water and a washcloth to gently rub at any mess, particularly in their hair. I know that some of their messes, including in their first nappies, can be hard to wipe off in one go. It will come off with gentle repeated strokes of wet cotton wool pads though!

One of my favourite mum tips I’ve stolen from a friend is really helpful if you just want to use water for the first six weeks rather than baby wipes or water wipes. Buy a tube of cotton wool pads, like the ones you would take eye makeup off with. They come in this plastic bag which you can fill with water and squeeze out again. As a result you are left with a tube of damp cotton wool pads, so when it comes to changing nappies, you don’t need to go and find some water in a bowl. Plus, you haven’t paid out for baby wipes or put all those chemicals on baby’s skin! Win-Win for everyone!

When those first six weeks have passed you may want to start using baby products like shampoo or bubble bath. There are plenty of choices out there. I find the lavender scented ones can be really soothing and help babies wind down to sleep.

Brush and Comb

While it’s true that many babies come out with very little hair, some actually have long hair, even in the early days. If you need to brush out any mess that is in it, I would recommend a baby brush or comb as they have much softer bristles.

Bath Thermometer

Keeping the water temperature right when bathing baby is something lots of parents worry about. I would recommend testing it by dipping the inner side of your wrist into it. If it feels too hot, then cool it down with cold water. If you would prefer a specific reading and visual guide then invest in a bath thermometer. They float on top of the bath water and show exactly how warm the water is, giving a colour coded measurement for you to easily understand.

I have another useful tip when it comes to filling baths and keeping baby safe if you don’t have a mixer tap. Always start by filling the tub with cold water. Put the hot water in after this to raise the temperature. This ensures that if you are called away before the bath is fully filled and someone else thinks they are being helpful by putting the baby in the water for you, it’ll just be uncomfortable for baby rather than burning!

Nail Scissors

Babies are born with amazing fingernails! It always fills me with awe and wonder that they are so perfectly miniature. Unfortunately they can be very sharp and when babies are still learning that they have control over their arms, hands and fingers, their own nails can scratch their little eyes and faces.

Every parent will recommend a different technique for trimming baby’s nails, which could be a god thing, as you know you’ll find something that you feel comfortable doing. There are ordinary nail scissors or baby nail scissors, which are smaller and have a larger body for stability. Some parents say they use their teeth to bite off the nails, or roll off the excess nail when the nails are soft from the bath. Another tip from another mum friend of mine is to use a nail file, which fits onto your finger like a thimble. It’s called a thumble, and you can see it here.

Baby Lotion or Cream

As I’ve mentioned above, for the first six weeks while the skin is adjusting, it is best to avoid baby products. However, once you’ve past that point and the skin has settled and developed its natural bacteria/acid balance, lotions and creams can be great. You can use them during baby massage or just after bathing baby. They can help keep skin soft and somehow enhance that magical ‘baby smell’ we all secretly love!

Bath Toys and Storage

At some point when baby gets a little older, they will really enjoy baths and having some toys to play with can be brilliant fun. However, since this won’t necessarily be for the first few weeks, this section can definitely be one where you can wait to see what gifts you might receive before you spend your own money on them. Just remember that as with most of your life, your bathroom will eventually be overrun by baby stuff, so planning some sort of toy storage is a good idea!

Please follow and like us:
error
Labour and Birth, Latest news, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Problems

When Pregnancy isn’t Pleasant

I want to let you in on a secret. It’s one that the press and social media and even your friends don’t want to tell you.

Sometimes pregnancy sucks.

You might be looking at all these stylised photos and posts telling you how wonderful women are finding their pregnancy. They describe how they feel as if they are glowing and finding fulfilment and a new purpose.

If you read those posts and feel inadequate or upset by them, you are not alone! I can’t tell you the number of women who come into my clinic each week feeling tired and exhausted and fed up and very unglamorous!

They have aches and pains in very private places, they can’t sleep and can’t eat and are too exhausted to do more than crash on the sofa after work. Some of them are physically sick every day well beyond the expected 12 weeks. For some, migraines sometimes get better during pregnancy but sometimes they get much much worse. Other women develop crippling pelvic pain which leaves them on crutches for weeks until the baby is born. Still others suffer with heightened levels of anxiety and fear over the what if’s and unknowns of pregnancy, labour, birth and parenthood.

The problem these women face is that society expects them to be glowing. It expects them to be radiant and smiling and excited. Society might make you think that any other reaction to pregnancy makes you a bad mother.

Things to remember

A miserable pregnancy does not automatically lead to a miserable life as a new parent. You will probably feel a whole lot better once you aren’t carrying 8 to 15 pounds of extra baby and placenta around inside you.

Any feelings of frustration or dread don’t mean that you don’t or won’t love your baby. It simply means that pregnancy is hard for you, and that’s ok to admit.

There are things your midwife or health professional can do to help you. Don’t suffer in silence for fear of judgement. What you feel is valid and won’t be the first time they’ve heard someone struggling with pregnancy.

What you can do

Talk to someone you trust. It might be a close friend or family member you know had a difficult pregnancy themselves. Sharing your feelings enables people to encourage and reassure you that everything will be alright.

Speak to your GP or midwife. If you have sickness, pelvic pain, migraines or some other physical symptoms, they may be able to suggest treatments for you. If you are struggling with anxiety around your pregnancy, birth or parenthood, they can refer you to local counselling services where trained professionals can guide you through the anxiety to find your calming and coping strategies.

Take time to rest and give yourself some grace. You don’t have to live up to society’s expectations and post a glowing selfie every day! Just getting out of bed might be a major success for you, so celebrate it!

Keep your eyes on the prize! However hard this pregnancy might be, focus on the baby and your parenthood to come. It will be worth it. They say parenthood is the hardest job in the world, which I definitely agree with, but it is also the most rewarding. There are so many stages to look forward to. If you aren’t keen on newborn babies, that’s ok. You might feel more confident looking after children when they reach the toddler stage. I promise that time will fly and that favourite age you like most will be here in no time!

Please follow and like us:
error
Labour and Birth, Latest news, New Mum, Newborn Care

Best Gifts for New Parents

It’s a very exciting time. Your best friends or favourite relatives have just had a baby and you want to spoil them silly at this special time. A hug from the newborn might be fun too! New parents often find the first few days and weeks with baby difficult. Here are my suggestions for gifts you can offer, to help them at this amazing and sometimes overwhelming time.

Consideration

This might not be something you can buy in a shop but it is definitely the most important gift of all! You need to remember that new parents might have had very little sleep, rarely get a chance to shower and really don’t want to think about housework.

You need to be honest about your relationship with the new parents and your reasons for wanting to visit or help. If they are really close friends and family where you share everyday life and see each other unshowered and in pyjamas regularly, unannounced visits might be fine. If not, your unscheduled visit is likely to cause more hassle than joy.

New parents might need to sleep during the day if baby was awake all night. They might want to spend what awake time they have holding their own baby, rather than cooking or cleaning in preparation for your visit. Alternatively, they might actually really appreciate someone holding the baby for them while they shower or eat or vacuum.

The key is be flexible in your visiting schedule and expectations. A pre-planned visit might not be possible after an unplanned night without sleep! Ask what the parents would appreciate most – someone to clean the toilets, a volunteer to play with older children or a baby being held while they shower and dress.

Books

A new parent has a lot of questions about their new life. Books that might answer some of those questions may be really appreciated. Perhaps try some humorous ones for when they are at the end of their tether, or informational ones that might explain baby development and milestones. One of my favourite books is ‘Your Amazing Newborn’. It explains the vast abilities of babies to recognise shapes, colours, faces and voices. It’s brilliant for new parents who want to learn more about their baby and bond with it through games like pulling faces and singing.

Door signs

Honestly, I think every parent should invest in one of these. Babies often start life thinking that day is night and night is day. As a result, new families often need to catch up on sleep during the day and an unexpected delivery man or neighbour might not realise their visit is poorly timed. One knock which wakes the dog, who wakes mum, dad and the baby can really ruin their rest! Find a pretty sign on pinterest or create your own to stick on the door, politely asking people to come back at another time or leave the parcel with a neighbour.

Food

All new babies take a lot of time, and homemade meals are not always easy to fit in to the schedule. When you are already cooking for your family, can you make an extra couple of portions to freeze? If you take that ready cooked meal to the new parents, it will make their day! For those with enough freezer space and generous friends they may not need to worry about meals for a couple of weeks.

Childcare

If you have a good relationship with the new parents and their children, could you offer to babysit the older children? Perhaps you could take them to the park or just to your house to play with your kids. That might allow the parents to get some rest. Maybe the parents would appreciate it if you offered to hold the baby while they play with their older children. This helps those older siblings who feel confused and upset by the amount of parental time and attention the new baby takes from them.

Housework

Any help in this category definitely enters you into the great friend hall of fame! Whatever you feel able to help with will probably be appreciated. You could clean or vacuum for them. You could even take a load of laundry and ironing home and return it ready to be hung up or folded and put away. For those active animal lovers, there is the opportunity to walk the dog. If you’re already on your way to the shops, send a quick text to ask if they need anything. It would be even more amazing if you were able to do their whole grocery shop for them. Just as long as they give you their list with preferred brands!

Time

Sometimes, especially after the first couple of weeks, a new mum can feel isolated and stuck on the sofa with a cluster feeding baby. Their partner may be back at work. Most visitors have had their baby hug and gone on with their lives. Some mums might really appreciate you spending time with them.  Having an adult conversation, even if their brain isn’t working clearly due to sleep deprivation, can be wonderful. A listening ear and reassurance that they’re doing a great job really helps when they are worried they’re not a perfect parent.

Photos

Have you ever noticed that a first baby has lots of photos taken every day? Unfortunately with the subsequent siblings the number of photos decreases significantly. Those cute cards you can place next to baby declaring their first smile or their 10th week are really only used for baby number one. Intimate family photos are not so easy with more children especially in the midst of life’s commitments.

If you know you have some pretty good photo skills, why not take some natural family photos for them? You could catch them doing normal life things like cooking whilst juggling a newborn and a toddler, or giving the baby a secret smile. These photos will be so precious to the family later on as they might be too busy just keeping up with life to take photos themselves. You can send them on to the parents as soon as you’ve taken them. You could even create a photo album online to give as a present!

Subscriptions

If parents have to spend a lot of time in the middle of the night feeding or changing the baby, they may appreciate some entertainment options to keep themselves amused. Why not buy them a subscription to a video streaming service so that they can watch the latest movies or TV epics while the little one feeds? You could also try an audiobook subscription and add a quality pair of wireless headphones to make it extra special. For the avid readers, what about an ebook subscription and device to read them on?

 

So there we have it. A selection of really useful gifts for new parents. Many of them cost very little but will make a huge difference to the family. Have you got any other suggestions, or ideas you wish someone had done for you? Let me know in the comments below!

Please follow and like us:
error
Latest news, New Mum, Newborn Care

The Ultimate Checklist – Health Supplies

One of the worst experiences a new parent faces is when their child is ill. You worry that it may be incredibly serious and get so frustrated that you can’t seem to make them feel better. If you are worried about your child’s health, please contact a medical professional as soon as possible. Once you have be reassured by them, you may find the supplies below helpful in managing the symptoms of common colds or other minor ailments in babies.

This post is part of the series based on my Ultimate Baby Equipment Checklist. You can find the original checklist here. The other posts have information on nursery equipment and equipment to help with getting out of the house.

Health Baby First Aid Supplies

Saline drops

Did you know that babies are born without knowing how to sniff? Whilst you and I sniff almost without thinking when our nasal passages are blocked, babies don’t have this option. Because of this, they sneeze more often than we do. While this might be worrying, most of the time it is a normal response to a stuffy nose.

You can make it easier using saline drops. These drops of simple salty water come in a handy squirty pack. You simply squirt it up each nostril and the drops will flush out any gunk that is stuck there.

Nasal Aspirator

Although saline drops can help, the most effective way to get rid of build up in baby’s nose is to use a nasal aspirator.  These little things involve a small tube which you pass gently into the lowest part of the baby’s nostril. Don’t try and force the tube a long way up as that could cause damage. The other end of the tube goes in your mouth and you suck – yes, suck – out any debris that is in there. In years gone by, you only had ordinary tubes but thankfully now you get a filter placed in the middle of the tube. This prevents any mess being sucked out of baby’s nose and getting into your mouth! Certainly a win for technological advances!

Snuffle Babe

If you’ve heard of Vicks Vapour Rub, then you’ll understand when I explain that Snuffle Babe is the same thing, but designed for babies. This makes it safe to use from 3 months. It is a decongestant and includes eucalyptus oil and methol. Consequently, it can be really useful for helping baby breathe more easily when they have a cold. It is a little less powerful than Vicks so that it doesn’t overwhelm little ones.

You can put a small layer onto their chest or back, although lots of parents feel more comfortable putting it on their baby’s feet. Once you cover their feet with a pair of socks, you reduce the risk that your baby will transfer it into their eyes.

Vapouriser / Humidifier

Another great tool for babies with colds is humidity. You can buy fancy vapourisers or humidifiers from many stores. These have a reservoir of water which is gently heated to evaporate and increase the water content of the air. The idea is that the air with an increased water content helps to soften and clear out any nasal secretions and soothe coughs.  The great thing about vapourisers or humidifiers is that some have the option of adding a soothing aroma to the water. Adding lavender oil may be really helpful if your baby is struggling to sleep.

However, as promised there is a much cheaper option for those on a budget, and you already have what you need in your house! Your secret weapon is your bathroom or shower room. Simply take baby into the room and run a really hot bath or shower. It can be really hot, as you aren’t going to be bathing or showering baby. You just need to get the room really steamy. Simply sitting with little one in your arms for a while in that environment will help to clear out any congestion they’ve got. You might also find the kitchen gets steamed up when you are cooking or boiling the kettle. This steam is just as effective, and you might feel you are being more productive in cooking and helping baby at the same time!

Colic Relief

Babies often struggle to bring up any wind after they’ve fed. This wind is extra air they take in while they are swallowing their milk, and can happen no matter how they are feeding. Please don’t listen to anyone who tells you that breastfed babies don’t get wind. They do, especially if they are a quick feeder or your milk supply let down is fast.  Wind can also be cause by poor digestion when baby struggles to break down the milk in their stomach.

This trapped wind causes pain as it gurgles in their tummy. While some babies can burp it out without any problems, others will push it through their digestive system and out into their nappy. Others can’t move it either way very well. These babies are often very unsettled after feeds, and don’t want to be put down flat. Some will pull their legs up towards their tummies, while others will arch their backs with the discomfort.

I’ve written a post about helping babies to burp and the various methods I use to help even the stubbornest bit of wind to escape. You can read that post here. However, sometimes you need a little extra help in the form of colic relief products.

Products that may help

There are various products which all work in slightly different ways. Unfortunately I don’t know which one will work for you and your baby. That’s why it might be sensible to have a couple of options ready in your health supplies kit. Traipsing out to the 24 hour supermarket at 3 am because your baby is in pain isn’t much fun!

There are two main ways that colic relief products work. Some provide an enzyme to break down the milk so that it is easily digested and doesn’t create wind. Others work by releasing bubbles of trapped air in the baby’s stomach so the wind rises to the top and can be burped out.

There are three main options for colic relief drops, and every baby responds differently to them. If you check them out on Amazon, there is always one review which says ‘this didn’t work for my baby’ amongst the hundreds that say ‘this was a lifesaver’, whichever product you look at. Go and have a look yourself and decide what works best for you. You may decide that getting one bottle of each will cover all possibilities. Alternatively, you may go for one you’ve heard of or that your friends or family have recommended.

Pain Relief

A paracetamol based pain killer such as Calpol is a staple ingredient of every parent’s medicine cabinet. It is a liquid form of paracetamol which can be given to babies via a syringe. It also tastes like strawberries or blackcurrant, which makes it easier to give to little ones.Whether you have a child with a cold or a headache or a sore finger, a pain killer is essential for those little discomforts that your medical professional has reassured you about.

Follow dosage instructions carefully and if you see no improvement after the child has had the medicine, seek further guidance from your doctor before trying another dose or different drug.

Ibuprofen also comes in a liquid form and can be used if your child does not have asthma. Don’t use both at the same time unless told to do so by a medical professional.

When giving your baby or child a drug they have never had before, such as Ibuprofen or Paracetamol, please be very vigilant for any signs of an allergic reaction. This might include swelling or a rash and in extremely rare cases, difficulty breathing. If you notice any side effects please contact a medical professional immediately.

Also, keep all medicines out of reach of little hands that might be exploring!

Thermometer

Another essential piece of equipment for every parent is a thermometer. Thermometers enable you to accurately check your baby’s temperature and ensure you take the right action. For example, a temperature up to 37.9 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Fahrenheit) may be safely treated at home with paracetamol if there are no other concerns. However, any temperature above this needs to be assessed by a doctor, so you should attend your nearest emergency centre.

Please note you may need to seek medical advice if a child is unwell even if their temperature is less than 38 degrees Celsius (100 degrees Farenheit). Use your own judgement and consider any other symptoms. Above all, trust your instincts! A doctor would rather see you and little one and reassure you than have you stay at home when your baby needs their care.

There are many different ways to measure a baby’s temperature. You can use their ear, their forehead, their underarm, their mouth or their rectum!

I recommend sticking to either their ear or forehead.

Underarm readings can be inconsistent as you have to place the probe in the dip under their arm and hold their arm down whilst it reads, which isn’t as easy as it might sound. Readings from oral thermometers may be altered depending on whether little one has just drunk or eaten something hot or cold. Rectal measurements are not only uncomfortable but also risk injury to the baby if inserted too far or if you slip whilst holding it in place.

Sunscreen

Babies have very sensitive skin and cots and prams should be placed out of direct sunlight if possible. However, sometimes a little sunshine is unavoidable and it is best to have sun screen on hand. Even on less sunny days, your baby’s skin may need a barrier in case the sun pops out as you’re on your way to the park. Keep some sunscreen in your bag to ensure your baby is fully protected.

 

So there you have it, my slimline recommendations for baby’s first aid kit. Do you have any other suggestions or ‘must-have’s’? Leave me a comment below!

Please follow and like us:
error