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The Ultimate Checklist – Bathtime

Welcome to the next instalment of my ultimate equipment checklist. This post covers all that you might need for bathing baby. You can find the full checklist here and follow the links on that page to the other posts covering other equipment categories.

Baby Bath

There are several options for baby baths. Most people start with a basic baby bath tub, which enables you to do the bathing in any room in the house. You simply move the tub to the room you choose. You can get small simple tubs or ones with integrated seats or supports to help keep baby in position.

I can not emphasise enough that you should never rely on a bath seat to support baby in a bath. They can slip or fail and baby could end up under the water. Never ever leave a baby unattended in the bath even for a second. Ignore the phone and door or remove the baby from the water and wrap them in a towel. After that, you can put them in a safe place like a Moses basket before you leave the room.

As baby grows and is more able to sit up in the bath, you might like to try a bath seat to support them. You should still not leave them unattended in the seat.

There are also bath dividers available which can be useful if you don’t want to buy a smaller baby bath tub. These fit into your existing bath so that you can just fill a portion of it. As a result, you save water and filling time. It also means that toys can’t float so far away from little one during play!

Hooded towels

These are brilliant for drying baby after the bath. The hood keeps precious warmth from escaping from little one’s head. Their shape also makes swaddling much easier.

I would always recommend using two towels to dry the baby to start with. That’s because you might be a little slower at putting on the nappy and dressing them when they are new and small. In order to keep baby as warm as possible, dry them off with one towel first, then throw that in the hamper and use a fresh dry towel to wrap around baby while you dress them.

Washcloth

Small washcloths or flannels can be helpful for washing baby in much the same way that you would use it on yourself. It holds water, so you can wet all the areas of their skin and their hair. It also offer a little more friction than just using your hands, which can be helpful in the early days. That’s because in the first six weeks after birth we recommend that you don’t use any skincare products on baby, no matter how many midwives might use them, according to their adverts!

Baby’s skin is very sensitive and adjusting to being in the outside world. It has to develop a set of normal healthy bacteria and acids. If you use anything other than plain water you risk disrupting this developing balance and this may be linked to increases in eczema and other skin problems. Once the baby is 6 weeks old, you can begin using skincare products. I will be writing another post on newborn skincare shortly, so look out for that for more information.

Baby shampoo or bubble bath

As I’ve mentioned above, for first six weeks after the birth, the recommendation is to avoid products for skin care. Instead, use plain water and a washcloth to gently rub at any mess, particularly in their hair. I know that some of their messes, including in their first nappies, can be hard to wipe off in one go. It will come off with gentle repeated strokes of wet cotton wool pads though!

One of my favourite mum tips I’ve stolen from a friend is really helpful if you just want to use water for the first six weeks rather than baby wipes or water wipes. Buy a tube of cotton wool pads, like the ones you would take eye makeup off with. They come in this plastic bag which you can fill with water and squeeze out again. As a result you are left with a tube of damp cotton wool pads, so when it comes to changing nappies, you don’t need to go and find some water in a bowl. Plus, you haven’t paid out for baby wipes or put all those chemicals on baby’s skin! Win-Win for everyone!

When those first six weeks have passed you may want to start using baby products like shampoo or bubble bath. There are plenty of choices out there. I find the lavender scented ones can be really soothing and help babies wind down to sleep.

Brush and Comb

While it’s true that many babies come out with very little hair, some actually have long hair, even in the early days. If you need to brush out any mess that is in it, I would recommend a baby brush or comb as they have much softer bristles.

Bath Thermometer

Keeping the water temperature right when bathing baby is something lots of parents worry about. I would recommend testing it by dipping the inner side of your wrist into it. If it feels too hot, then cool it down with cold water. If you would prefer a specific reading and visual guide then invest in a bath thermometer. They float on top of the bath water and show exactly how warm the water is, giving a colour coded measurement for you to easily understand.

I have another useful tip when it comes to filling baths and keeping baby safe if you don’t have a mixer tap. Always start by filling the tub with cold water. Put the hot water in after this to raise the temperature. This ensures that if you are called away before the bath is fully filled and someone else thinks they are being helpful by putting the baby in the water for you, it’ll just be uncomfortable for baby rather than burning!

Nail Scissors

Babies are born with amazing fingernails! It always fills me with awe and wonder that they are so perfectly miniature. Unfortunately they can be very sharp and when babies are still learning that they have control over their arms, hands and fingers, their own nails can scratch their little eyes and faces.

Every parent will recommend a different technique for trimming baby’s nails, which could be a god thing, as you know you’ll find something that you feel comfortable doing. There are ordinary nail scissors or baby nail scissors, which are smaller and have a larger body for stability. Some parents say they use their teeth to bite off the nails, or roll off the excess nail when the nails are soft from the bath. Another tip from another mum friend of mine is to use a nail file, which fits onto your finger like a thimble. It’s called a thumble, and you can see it here.

Baby Lotion or Cream

As I’ve mentioned above, for the first six weeks while the skin is adjusting, it is best to avoid baby products. However, once you’ve past that point and the skin has settled and developed its natural bacteria/acid balance, lotions and creams can be great. You can use them during baby massage or just after bathing baby. They can help keep skin soft and somehow enhance that magical ‘baby smell’ we all secretly love!

Bath Toys and Storage

At some point when baby gets a little older, they will really enjoy baths and having some toys to play with can be brilliant fun. However, since this won’t necessarily be for the first few weeks, this section can definitely be one where you can wait to see what gifts you might receive before you spend your own money on them. Just remember that as with most of your life, your bathroom will eventually be overrun by baby stuff, so planning some sort of toy storage is a good idea!

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